Panther Chameleon Genetics

Selectively Breeding Furcifer Pardalis

The best Panther Chameleon breeders have a deep understanding of their genetics, inheritance patterns and can help you get what you want. This knowledge plays into the ethics of selling Panther Chameleons because there is a lot of false advertising in the industry which is very surface-level without much understanding of the species. Introduction Given that Panther Chameleon (Furcifer pardalis) colors are polygenic traits, and Panther Chameleons are a sexually dimorphic species, selective breeding for a given color is challenging and many breeders fail to achieve a consistent result.

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Furcifer pardalis Body Color Inheritance Theory

This article describes how Panther Chameleons inherit their color over multiple generations. There are many myths in the industry related to what you can get from various Panther Chameleon pairings, and these misconceptions result in pricing issues and scams. TLDR; Most individuals have multiple body colors because the complete absence of a color is extremely rare. If a color is found in that locale, you usually can find at least some of it somewhere on every individual’s body from that locale.

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Chameleon Academy: Genetic Testing for Panther Chameleon Locale

This episode explains the origins of the genetic test for panther chameleon locale. It features Benson Morrill, PhD of Rare Genetics, Inc. and myself. What we know about local forms Challenges that a genetic test would provide better information on Pricing and project stage Data underpinning the test Testing strategy

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Community Funded Genetic Test for Furcifer pardalis Haplogroup

Panther Chameleons (Furcifer pardalis) display an amazing variety of colors within distinct locales that are physically separated by mountains, oceans, rivers and mangrove forests. The Panther Chameleon hobby has never had a reliable way to test animals for locale origin, and we have had to rely on import labels, guessing locale based off of male phenotypes, or what the breeder one gen upstream said. However, females do not display their phenotype and have always been “proven out” by breeding with a male from an assumed locale and observing their offspring to determine if they look like we would expect.

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New iPardalis Genes

Zanaka (F2) Zanaka is F2 because his mother’s father was a wild-caught Ambilobe named Herb (Fanitso), owned by Kammerflage Kreations. Bohana (CH) Bohana was hatched by Busy B’s Exotics from eggs laid by an Ambilobe female imported in 2019. Bohana’s brothers proved out and are some very nice yellow body blue bar Ambilobe, like this guy owned by Daniel Gordinho named Goldust: I was thinking of pairing these two together, but Nugget has really impressed us.

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